Book Chapters

-“Introduction: Conceptualizing the Political Economy of Regional Transitions,” (with Steven E. Lobell), in Steven E. Lobell and Norrin M. Ripsman, eds., The Political Economy of Regional Peacemaking (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, forthcoming).

-“The Economics of Peacemaking: Lessons from Western Europe and the Middle East,” in Steven E. Lobell and Norrin M. Ripsman, eds., The Political Economy of Regional Peacemaking (Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Press, forthcoming).

-“Introduction: Grand Strategy in the Interwar Years,” (with Steven E. Lobell & Jeffrey W. Taliaferro), in Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, Norrin M. Ripsman, & Steven E. Lobell, eds., The Challenge of Grand Strategy: The Great Powers and the Broken Balance Between the World Wars (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

-“British Grand Strategy and the Rise of Germany, 1933-1936,” (with Jack S. Levy), in Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, Norrin M. Ripsman, & Steven E. Lobell, eds., The Challenge of Grand Strategy: The Great Powers and the Broken Balance Between the World Wars (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012).

-“Top-Down Peacemaking: Why Peacemaking Begins with States and not Societies,” chap. 11 in T.V. Paul, ed., International Relations Theory and Regional Transformation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

-“Neoclassical Realism,” in Robert Denemark et. al., eds. The International Studies Compendium Project (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2011).

-“Domestic Practices and Balancing: Integrating Practice Into Neoclassical Realism,” chap. 8 in Vincent Pouliot and Emanuel Adler, eds., International Practices (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2010).

-“Introduction: Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Policy,” (with Jeffrey W. Taliaferro & Steven E. Lobell), pp. 1-42 in Steven E. Lobell, Norrin M. Ripsman, & Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, eds., Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Policy (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2009).

-“Neoclassical Realism and Domestic Interest Groups,” pp. 170-193 in Steven E. Lobell, Norrin M. Ripsman, & Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, eds., Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Policy (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2009).

-“The Future of Neoclassical Realism,” (with Jeffrey W. Taliaferro & Steven E. Lobell), pp. 280-299 in Steven E. Lobell, Norrin M. Ripsman, & Jeffrey W. Taliaferro, eds., Neoclassical Realism, the State, and Foreign Policy (Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2009).


-“False Dichotomy: Why Economics Has Always Been High Politics,” pp. 15-31 in Peter Dombrowski, ed., Guns and Butter: The Political Economy of International Security (Boulder: Lynne Reinner, 2005).


-“Moving Beyond (or Beneath) the Democratic Peace Theory: Rediscovering Intermediate-Level Institutions in the Foreign Security Policy Literature,” pp. 301-318 in Andre Lecours, ed., New Institutionalism: Theory and Analysis (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005).


-“Qualitative Research on Economic Interdependence and Conflict: Overcoming Methodological Hurdles,” (with Jean-Marc F. Blanchard) in Edward D. Mansfield and Brian Pollins, eds., Economic Interdependence and International Conflict: New Perspectives on an Enduring Debate (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2003).

-“Big Eyes and Empty Pockets: the Two Phases of Mulroney’s Defence Policy,” in Nelson Michaud and Kim Richard Nossal, eds., Diplomatic Departures: The Conservative Era in Foreign Policy (Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 2002).


-“Contextual Information and the Study of Trade and Conflict: The Utility of an Interdisciplinary Approach,” (with Jean-Marc F. Blanchard) pp. 57-85 in Rudra Sil and Eileen M. Doherty, eds., Beyond Boundaries? Disciplines, Paradigms, and Theoretical Integration in International Studies (Albany: SUNY Press, 2000).